Watchlist #1: The Oscars – Best Pictures Winners

My goal is to finish all 90+ films before I turn thirty. #30by30

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Academy Award Best Picture Winners

1927/28 – Wings directed by William A. Wellman 

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1928/29 – The Broadway Melody directed by Harry Beaumont

1929/30 – All Quiet on the Western Front directed by Lewis Milestone

1930/31 – Cimarron directed by Wesley Ruggles

1931/32 – Grand Hotel  directed by Edmond Goulding

1932/33 – Calvacade directed by Frank Lloyd

1934 – It Happened One Night directed by Frank Capra 

1935 – Mutiny on the Bounty directed by Frank Lloyd

1936 – The Great Ziegfeld directed by Robert Z. Leonard

1937 – The Life of Emile Zola directed by William Dieterle

1938 – You Can’t Take it with You directed by Frank Capra

1939 – Gone with the Wind directed by Victor Fleming

1940 – Rebecca directed by Alfred Hitchcock

1941 – How Green Was My Valley directed by John Ford

1942 – Mrs. Miniver directed by William Wyler

1943 – Casablanca directed by Michael Curtiz

1944 – Going My Way directed by Leo McCarey

1945 – The Lost Weekend directed by Billy Wilder

1946 – The Best Years of Our Lives directed by William Wyler

1947 – Gentlemen’s Agreement directed by Elia Kazan✓

1948 – Hamlet directed by Laurence Oliver

1949 – All the King’s Men directed by Robert Rossen

1950 – All About Eve directed by Joesph L. Mankiewicz

1951 – An American in Paris directed by Vincente Minnelli

1952 – The Greatest Show on Earth directed by Cecil B. DeMille

1953 – From Here to Eternity directed by Fred Zinnemann ✓ 

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1954 – On the Waterfront directed by Elia Kazan

1955 – Marty directed by Delbert Mann

1956 – Around the World in 80 Days directed by Michael Anderson

1957 – The Bridge on the River Kwai directed by David Lean

1958 – Gigi directed by Vincente Minnelli ✓ 

1959 – Ben-Hur directed by William Wyler

1960 – The Apartment  directed by Billy Wilder

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1961 – West Side Story directed by Robert Wise and Jerome Robbins✓

1962 – Lawrence of Arabia directed by David Lean

1963 – Tom Jones directed by Tony Richardson

1964 – My Fair Lady directed by George Cukor

1965 – The Sound of Music directed by Robert Wise ✓

1966 – A Man for All Seasons directed by Fred Zinnemann

1967 – In the Heat of the Night directed by Norman Jewison

1968 – Oliver! directed by Carol Reed

1969 – Midnight Cowboy directed by John Schlesinger

1970 – Patton directed by Franklin J. Schaffner

1971 – The French Connection directed by William Friedkin

1972 – The Godfather directed by Francis Ford Coppola 

1973 – The Sting directed by George Roy Hill

1974 – The Godfather Part II directed by Francis Ford Coppola

1975 – One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest directed by Miloš Forman 

1976 – Rocky directed by John G. Avildsen

1977 – Annie Hall directed by Woody Allen

1978 – The Deer Hunter directed by Michael Cimino 

1979 – Kramer vs. Kramer directed by Robert Benton 

1980 – Ordinary People directed by Robert Redford

1981 – Chariots of Fire directed by Hugh Hudson

1982 – Gandhi directed by Richard Attenborough

1983 – Terms of Endearment directed by James L. Brooks

1984 – Amadeus directed by Miloš Forman

1985 – Out of Africa directed by Sydney Pollack ✓ 

1986 – Platoon directed by Oliver Stone

1987 – The Last Emperor directed by Bernardo Bertolucci

1988 – Rain Man  directed by Barry Levinson 

1989 – Driving Miss Daisy directed by Bruce Beresford

1990 – Dances with Wolves directed by Kevin Costner

1991 – Silence of the Lambs directed by Jonathan Demme 

1992 – Unforgiven directed by Clint Eastwood

1993 – Schindler’s List directed by Steven Spielberg

1994 – Forrest Gump directed by Robert Zemeckis ✓

1995 – Braveheart directed by Mel Gibson

1996 – The English Patient directed by Anthony Minghella 

1997 – Titanic directed by James Cameron ✓

1998 – Shakespeare in Love directed by John Madden 

1999 – American Beauty directed by Sam Mendes 

2000 – Gladiator directed by Ridley Scott

2001 – A Beautiful Mind directed by Ron Howard 

2002 – Chicago directed by Rob Marshall 

2003 – The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King directed by Peter Jackson

2004 – Million Dollar Baby directed by Cint Eastwood 

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2005 – Crash directed by Paul Haggis 

2006 – The Departed directed by Martin Scorsese 

2007 – No Country for Old Men directed by Joel and Ethan Coen 

2008 – Slumdog Millionaire directed by Danny Boyle 

2009 – The Hurt Locker directed by Kathryn Bigelow 

2010 – The King’s Speech directed by Tom Hooper✓

2011 – The Artist directed by Michel Hazanavicius 

2012 – Argo directed by Ben Affleck

2013 – 12 Years a Slave directed by Steve McQueen ✓

2014 – Birdman directed by Alejandro G. Iñárritu 

2015 – Spotlight directed by Tom McCarthy 

2016 – Moonlight directed by Barry Jenkins 

2017The Shape of Water by Guillermo del Toro 

2018 – Green Book by Peter Farrelly

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Books and Movies Lists

Building Your Legacy Through Reminiscence

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“You have a four-fold life to live: a body, a brain, a heart and a soul . . . these are your living tools. To use and develop them is not a task. . . . It is a golden opportunity.”

~ William H. Danforth,  I Dare You!

Day to day, I try to focus on balancing a four-fold life by acknowledging the physical, mental, social and spiritual impacts and benefits of life experiences.  In many instances of Reminiscence Therapy research I am finding the benefits of the recollection of stories, life lessons, feelings, smells etc. in all four of these areas. Most of the articles recommend this therapy for patients who have dementia or Alzheimer’s  but I think it is important for all ages and variations of mental health.

Today I found an organization, by luck of the search, called LifeBio. They provide a service to help family members get to know each other in a way they didn’t realize they could.

Now, I haven’t used this service or done much more research on the organization, but I think the idea is wonderful. I found the post below in the LifeBio blog:

http://www.lifebio.org/about-us/blog/storytelling-for-health-and-wellbeing/

Storytelling is powerful and it is natural.  Why should it be encouraged?  Because it is also good for people’s health and sense of wellbeing.

Here is how LifeBio sees reminiscence touching ALL dimensions of wellness, and why it cannot be ignored as a tool to use with seniors at home, in senior living, assisted living, nursing homes, or with those who have memory challenges.  Besides unlocking a fascinating story, it leads to an amazing opportunity for engagement.

  • Physical – Activate the hippocampus area of brain where memories are stored.  “Autobiography for older adults is like chocolate for the brain,” said Dr. Gene Cohen in a conversation with Beth Sanders, Founder of LifeBio.
  • Spiritual – Deeply touch people as they share beliefs, values, life lessons, etc.
  • Occupational – This gives people an important job to do.  Creating a LEGACY.
  • Emotional – Joys and challenges are recorded and shared.  LifeBio has been found to increase happiness and satisfaction with life.  “Get it off your chest.”
  • Environmental – Life stories build a strong sense of community.
  • Intellectual – Life stories help people learn about themselves and about other people.  Fascinating new knowledge and people learn to listen.
  • Social – People form new bonds with their neighbors and become friends through the power of story.

And there they are, the four-fold and more. The one I found of particular interest is the occupational dimension. “Creating a LEGACY.” 

This is what Downright Ultimate is all about. A legacy is an important part of reaching ultimacy.  We strive to do things that we will be remembered by while we are becoming ultimate.

So let’s do this! If we remember the books that made us think, the toys that made us giggle, the songs that made us dance, the jokes that made us laugh, then we can share these things with others in hopes they will go on to share them too.

Legacy is being created before your eyes. Reminiscence and storytelling give us the opportunity to relive the best moments to pass on the joy and the worst moments to pass on the wisdom.

Think about filmmaking.  We watch many of the movies and television shows that we do because we feel like we’ve connected to the story. Filmmakers do this on purpose. They take memories of their own and add a taste of humor, a lovable best friend, an unexpected twist and we’re hooked. It makes us think, feel and relate.

Okay, you’re right, we won’t all become the next Speilberg, but we should tell our stories. And more importantly, we must listen to other people’s stories. When Grandpa says, “Back in my day …” don’t look away, Grandpa is about to drop some wisdom.

It may seem small, but the sharing of that one lesson or song or joke or quote can make a huge difference.

So now, I encourage you all to recall a time or an object in your life. Look for a time of peace, happiness, humor, adventure, surprise; Or if it’s an object, look for a special memento, an old record, an old photo, a game you used to play, a song you like to sing. Now go tell someone about it. Tell ME about it! Or better yet, blog about it! Tell a story that reminds you that you are a living, breathing, feeling being. Connect with yourself and your family or friends or readers.

Reminisce and enjoy!

 

 

 

 

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four-fold life Inspiration

15 Movies

As a student in film watching movies is like homework but I hadn’t been doing a very good job at keeping up. I have access to movies on DVD, at the theater, on Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu and on Xfinity OnDemand…my watchlist goes on and on.
On September 7, 2015, I started keeping track of the movies I was watching. My goal was to watch at least 15 movies that I hadn’t seen before by November 7, 2015…here’s the list!

  1. A Serious Man (2009)
    • Directed by Ethan and Joel Coen
    • Starring Michael Stuhlbarg, Richard King, Sari Lennick
    • Trivia: The Coen Brothers stated that the opening scene was nothing more than a little short that they made up to get the audience in the proper mood, and that there is no meaning behind it.
    • Watched at home on DVD
    • Thoughts: Strange but it kept my interest
  2. The Man from U.N.C.L.E. (2015)
    • Directed by Guy Ritchie
    • Starring Henry Cavill, Armie Hammer, Alicia Vikander
    • Trivia: The only principal cast members to use their natural accents in the film were ‘Sylvester Groth’ and ‘Hugh Grant’.
    • Watched in theater
    • Thoughts: Definitely entertaining and Armie Hammer is a beautiful man
  3. Behind the Candelabra (2013)
  4. L!fe Happens (2011)
  5. Vertigo (1958)
    • Directed by Alfred Hitchcock
    • Starring James Stewart, Kim Novak
    •  Trivia: There is a 25 year age difference between James Stewart and Kim Novak, who were 49 and 24 respectively when the film was shot in 1957.
    • Watched in my Scoring class at DePaul
    • Thoughts: Brilliant, I’ll always appreciate the work of Hitchcock and the score is simple but yet again, brilliant. But the ending makes me so angry.
  6. The Intern (2015)
  7. THX 1138 (1971)
    • Directed by George Lucas 
    • Starring Robert Duvall 
    • Trivia: The sounds of the police motorcycles are the sped-up sounds of women screaming together in a tiled bathroom.
    • Watched in my Sound Effects class at DePaul
    • Thoughts: Totally weird, and I still don’t quite get it but the sounds effects are awesome.
  8. Black Mass (2015)
  9. Chef (2014)
    • Directed by Jon Favreau
    • Starring Jon Favreau
    • Trivia: Jon Favreau did his own cooking by training with food truck chef Roy Choi.
    • Watched at home on Netflix
    • Thoughts: An endearing film that put a special light on a father-son relationship
  10. Moonrise Kingdom (2012)
  11. Crimson Peak (2015)
    • Directed by Guillermo del Toro 
    • Starring  Mia Wasikowska, Jessica Chastain, Tom Hiddleston 
    • Trivia: Everything in the house was made for the house. Nothing was reused from salvaged parts.
    • Watched in the theater for my Scoring class
    • Thoughts: Most certainly a Gothic Romance, not a Horror film. Beautifully dressed and shot. Jessica Chastain was amazing.
  12. Risky Business (1983)
    • Directed by Paul Brickman
    • Starring Tom Cruise, Rebecca De Mornay 
    • Trivia: The dance scene where Joel dances to “Old Time Rock N’ Roll” was completely improvised. In the script Tom Cruise was simply instructed to “dance to rock music”.
    • Watched at home on Netflix
    • Thoughts: A classic, glad I finally watched it!
  13. The Best of Me (2014)
  14. Boogie Nights (1997)
    • Directed by Paul Thomas Anderson
    • Starring Mark Wahlberg, Julianne Moore, Burt Reynolds
    • Watched at home on Netflix
    • Thoughts: That was an experience…but just another confirmation that I will watch any movie that stars Mark Wahlberg or Julianne Moore.
  15. The Room (2003)
    • Directed by Tommy Wiseau
    • Starring Tommy Wiseau
    • Trivia:
      • There are eight instances of the phrase “Don’t worry about it”, plus one “Don’t worry about that”, one “Don’t worry about me”, two “Don’t worry about Johnny”s, one “Don’t worry about those f*ckers”, and two plain old “Don’t worry”s.
      • There are thirty-four spoon shots.
      • A lot of the film’s dialogue was dubbed in, which is why there are many out-of-sync scenes, particularly those involving Johnny. Tommy Wiseau was said to be unable to memorize lines, necessitating the use of cue cards, and the sound crew was reportedly plagued with difficulties.
    • Watched at a friend’s house on DVD at about 12am
    • Thoughts: Terrible, seeing this once is more than enough. The dubbing makes me want to cry as a sound person.

So many movies, so little time.
Have you seen any good movies lately? I’m always taking recommendations!

Film Lists

The City and The Strange

Since starting Cinema Production at DePaul I have worked on many short films. Being on location brings me to places I would have never gone and shows me things I would have never seen. I feel like I have seen so much more of Chicago, and I love it. It’s given me the opportunity to take some cool photos of the city and of some really strange things…Here are a few photos I’ve taken on the way.

NaBloPoMo

Best Homework Ever

Films have always been a big part of my life and since I have started school at DePaul it has become an even bigger part. I hope to make a living in the film industry, so my life’s homework is to watch movies, and then watch more movies. I watch, I listen, I analyze. My skills for film analyzing and interpreting are still developing but I definitely don’t watch movies the way I used to. I have an appreciation for camera movement, well achieved visual effects and sound effects, film scores, story structure, the list goes on! I have even started going back to movies I have already seen and wonder what it was I liked or didn’t like about the film. For some films my opinions have completely changed, which has been cool and sad at the same time. I’ve realized many of the movies I watched and loved as a kid or teenager…well, they kinda suck. Perhaps that comes with age, but also just the understanding of how the film was made and what they were (or were not) trying to achieve has become much more apparent to me now.
In the past seven days I have watched several films and short films for the first time:

  • Her by Spike Jonze
  • Inside Man by Spike Lee
  • Snatch by Guy Ritchie
  • Tarnation by Jonathan Caouette
  • The Chicken by Una Gunjak
  • Look For Me by Laura Heit
  • Burn by Reynold Reynolds and Patrick Jolley
  • American History X by Tony Kaye

I feel emotionally affected and totally inspired in weird and amazing ways. A few of these hit me harder than others, particularly Tarnation and American History X. They are completely different types of movies, but boy, do they make you feel lucky to have the life you do, with the family, health, opportunities and tiny problems that you do compared to what you see on screen.

Film